Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 21

Thread: The Pace 2.0

  1. #11
    World SBK Champ miguel_812's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,068
    Location
    Jeffersonville, IN
    Bike
    2007 1000RR Current; 2006 1000RR (RIP)
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    14
    I just hang on grab my nuts and try not run into anyone or any walls. Jk kinda

  2. #12
    AMA Superbike Champ mars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    601
    Location
    California
    Bike
    GSXR, KTMs, Triumph, Yamaha, Honda
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    10
    So it seems I am all over the place on this. I read the article, good stuff. A couple of q's:

    1) Article talks about braking on a curve. As far as I was taught (MSF), that is a big no-no. How much is this true? I tried this long time ago and ended up low siding.

    2) On downshifting, when riding at a slow pace, I do clutch-blip-match-release. However, when I am going fast and need to slow down fast to take a curve, I apply full pressure on the front brake while applying slight pressure on the rear and really fast clutch-downshift-release without any rpm matching. This causes to lose traction on my rear wheel for the duration of the downshifts but usually not a problem if I manage finish all before I start the turn. Is this bad? I don't lock the wheel, just make it slip until engine/wheel catches up with road speed.

  3. #13
    World SBK Champ miguel_812's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    2,068
    Location
    Jeffersonville, IN
    Bike
    2007 1000RR Current; 2006 1000RR (RIP)
    Mentioned
    22 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by mars View Post
    So it seems I am all over the place on this. I read the article, good stuff. A couple of q's:

    1) Article talks about braking on a curve. As far as I was taught (MSF), that is a big no-no. How much is this true? I tried this long time ago and ended up low siding.

    2) On downshifting, when riding at a slow pace, I do clutch-blip-match-release. However, when I am going fast and need to slow down fast to take a curve, I apply full pressure on the front brake while applying slight pressure on the rear and really fast clutch-downshift-release without any rpm matching. This causes to lose traction on my rear wheel for the duration of the downshifts but usually not a problem if I manage finish all before I start the turn. Is this bad? I don't lock the wheel, just make it slip until engine/wheel catches up with road speed.
    Do you have a slipper clutch?

  4. #14
    AMA Superbike Champ mars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    601
    Location
    California
    Bike
    GSXR, KTMs, Triumph, Yamaha, Honda
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    10
    I dont know that i have one. I have a stock triumph triple.

  5. #15
    Old, grumpy mod cowasockee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    15,553
    Location
    Sellersburg
    Bike
    2008 Ducati Hypermotard
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by mars View Post
    1) Article talks about braking on a curve. As far as I was taught (MSF), that is a big no-no. How much is this true? I tried this long time ago and ended up low siding.
    The article is talking about the application of the brakes. You shouldn't apply the brakes once you are leaned over. One of two things will happen. You'll stand the bike up and run wide or, if you have enough lean angle, you'll overcome the traction of the front end.

    IF you are already on the brakes as you are leaning the bike, and consequently easing off of them as you apply lean angle, then you are trail braking. You can effectively adjust speed and your corner arc by adjusting pressure on the brakes then.

    See the difference? It's hard to explain.
    Sam

    2008 Ducati Hypermotard S
    2014 Kawasaki Ninja 1000
    2015 KTM Duke 390

    Happily free of the burden of any discernable talent since 1965

    "doctors say gear saved his life"

  6. #16
    AMA Superbike Champ mars's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    601
    Location
    California
    Bike
    GSXR, KTMs, Triumph, Yamaha, Honda
    Mentioned
    11 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    10
    Yes I think I do. Thanks.

  7. #17
    Track Day Star newt117's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    364
    Location
    Louisville
    Bike
    BMW S1000RR
    Mentioned
    15 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    11
    I have always blipped the throttle on down shifts... Until I got my first bike with a slipper clutch. Now I just downshift and ease the clutch out.

    Great discussion on trailbraking.
    http://www.s1000rrforum.com/forum/ri...ilbraking.html

  8. #18
    World SBK Champ Blackbird66's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,725
    Location
    Shelbyville
    Bike
    2007 RSV1000R
    Mentioned
    12 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by cowasockee View Post
    The article is talking about the application of the brakes. You shouldn't apply the brakes once you are leaned over. One of two things will happen. You'll stand the bike up and run wide or, if you have enough lean angle, you'll overcome the traction of the front end..
    Um, yes and no. Now I'm talking street here. Street pace. If you are mid turn, you should have enough traction left to brake. Yes the bike will want to "stand up", and run wide. Some more than others. You must apply more force to the bars to keep the bike turning. I have had to emergency brake, while leaned over on the street. It is possible. It may be necessary on the street. That is why THE PACE is emphasized is it not? You ride with enough reserve to handle the unexpected. I had a........ um..........."moment" on blood mountain when I had to brake hard in a corner on a V-Max, which handles like a pig. I was almost scrubbing foot pegs with the front forks bouncing off the stops fighting that damn beast. That lil' bias ply tyre on that heavy bike held the line.
    I think the secret is in the rate at which you apply brake force. I apply increasing pressure as I feel the weight transfer to the front tire. And I begin releasing pressure as the bike slows.

    ........but Im no expert.

  9. #19
    Track Day Star Rubber_Duc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    317
    Location
    Louisville
    Bike
    Ducati 748, YZF R6
    Mentioned
    6 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    8
    Good read thanks.
    "Rubber Ducks...Making Bath Time Fun Since 1970"


  10. #20
    Old, grumpy mod cowasockee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    15,553
    Location
    Sellersburg
    Bike
    2008 Ducati Hypermotard
    Mentioned
    44 Post(s)
    Tagged
    1 Thread(s)
    Rep Power
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by Blackbird66 View Post
    Um, yes and no. Now I'm talking street here. Street pace. If you are mid turn, you should have enough traction left to brake. Yes the bike will want to "stand up", and run wide. Some more than others. You must apply more force to the bars to keep the bike turning. I have had to emergency brake, while leaned over on the street. It is possible. It may be necessary on the street. That is why THE PACE is emphasized is it not? You ride with enough reserve to handle the unexpected. I had a........ um..........."moment" on blood mountain when I had to brake hard in a corner on a V-Max, which handles like a pig. I was almost scrubbing foot pegs with the front forks bouncing off the stops fighting that damn beast. That lil' bias ply tyre on that heavy bike held the line.
    I think the secret is in the rate at which you apply brake force. I apply increasing pressure as I feel the weight transfer to the front tire. And I begin releasing pressure as the bike slows.

    ........but Im no expert.
    But......if you trail brake, and it doesn't take much braking force at all, then you don't have to worry about the bike standing up when you add some brake in.
    Sam

    2008 Ducati Hypermotard S
    2014 Kawasaki Ninja 1000
    2015 KTM Duke 390

    Happily free of the burden of any discernable talent since 1965

    "doctors say gear saved his life"

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •